International Design Application (Hague)

International Design Applications

 

 

 

The Hague Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Industrial Designs, or the Hague Agreement, in short, is a system that enables applicants to submit a unified application instead of separate applications. The Hague Agreement is a collection of treaties, including the Hague Act of 1960 and the Geneva Act of 1999. A country has the choice of becoming a party to one or both the Hague Act and the Geneva Act. Act selection is important because applicants from a country can only get protection in other countries who have signed to the same act. Besides the convenience of filing one application, applicants also have to pay one set of fees and file the application in one language (choices include French, English, and Spanish).

Administered by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), The Hauge system allows applicants to protect up to 100 designs at a time. Applications can be submitted to the International Bureau of the WIPO or a Contracting Party (73 parties covering 90 countries). International design registrations and international design patents last for five years and can be extended four periods allowed by the Contracting Party. A design that meets WIPO requirements is entered into the International Register. If a Contracting Party has an issue with the design and does not want it get international registration, they must notify the International Bureau that they cannot accept the design.

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